\'Curious\' Baboon Knocks Out Power To Zambian Tourist Town

"Curiosity killed the cat," but a baboon who tampered with equipment at a power station in the Zambian town of Livingstone on Sunday, knocking out power to tens of thousands of people, was luckier than the unfortunate proverbial feline and has lived to tell the tale, officials say.

Zesco Ltd, the company that owns the power station, said on Monday that the primate had fiddled with a high voltage transformer and received a shock, but had survived and was now in the care of wildlife officials.

It said the blackout had lasted five hours, with some 40,000 customers left without electricity.

Read: 'Selfie monkey' on the brink in Indonesia

> Watch video 03:16

Share

Monkeying around is serious business

Send Facebook Twitter Google+ Whatsapp Tumblr linkedin stumble Digg reddit Newsvine

Permalink http://p.dw.com/p/2aMN6

Monkeying around is serious business

Monkey mischief

The power utility in Livingstone is close to a national park, but animals rarely wander into the plant.

The town is a hub for tourists visiting nearby Victoria Falls on the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe.

A monkey in Kenya caused a similar incident last year, although that blackout was nationwide.

  • Mandrill with baby (picture alliance/dpa/S.Radke)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The nose of a chief

    "Hey, I'm the boss here!" screams the colorful nose of the male Mandrill Ape - dominant males crow with brighter colors than those of inferiors. When a Mandrill gets mad or aroused, the blue parts on its nose glow even stronger. The red color stems from the Mandrill's high blood circulation, the blue results from the light breaking on its skin.

  • elephant's trunk (picture-alliance/Mary Evans Picture Library/P.Leeson/ardea.com)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The all-rounder nose

    Elephants trumpet, smell, grab, fight and even snorkel with their nose. Strictly speaking the elephant's trunk is a fusion of nose and upper lip. It also serves for communication, for example, when flehmening. That's a way to pick up scent or pheromones, which is especially important during mating season for males. Not only can the elephant smell its adored female's odor, but it can also taste it.

  • Roaring Sea Elephant (picture alliance/dpa/WILDLIFE)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The bulge nose for mating

    The sea elephant got its name from its bulging nose, which may remind you of an elephant's trunk. It dangles down over the animal's muzzle. During mating season the male pumps up his mouth with blood and air and gives off a loud noise to chase away its rivals. But both males and females absorb moisture through their noses - especially when fasting during mating season.

  • Picasso Triggerfish (picture alliance/dpa/H.Schmidbauer)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    Nose vs. sting

    One of the triggerfish's favorite dishes is sea urchins. So to ensure it doesn't get stung, the triggerfish developed a long "nose." To get to the soft and tasty interior of a sea urchin, the fish (the one in the photo is called Picasso) blows a strong jet of water on its prey, or clutches one sting with its mouth, and uses it to lift up the urchin and attack.

  • Snooping Anteater (Getty Images/F.Perry)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The tube snout

    What looks like a terribly long nose is actually the snout of the Giant Anteater. Its actual nose is at the very tip of it, and snoops in nooks and crannies for food - mostly ants and termites. When it finds a tasty morsel, the anteater stretches out a 90 centimeter-long (35 inches) gluing tongue and sticks its prey to it - 160 times per minute!

  • pig's trunk (picture alliance/dpa/E.Weingartner)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The plug socket nose

    The plug socket-like nose of a pig may look ugly to some, but it is very sensitive. It senses, feels, and smells scents up to 50 cm deep in the soil. Pigs have even more olfactory cells than the fine-nosed dog. That's why they are great truffle tracers. Sows are especially good at it - the smell of the precious mushrooms is very close to that of male pigs' pheromones.

  • Pug dog in pink coat (picture-alliance/dpa)

    Pumping, snorkeling, talking - the amazing talents of animal noses

    The sniffy and spoiled

    Pug-nosed dogs are a human creation. They're nearly square in shape, and said to have been first reared in China centuries ago as an exclusive privilege of the emperor. Later it accompanied noble ladies in paintings. People have bred pug dogs for entertainment, but the dog suffers - its respiratory organs are highly contracted, giving it its characteristic panting and leading to illness.

    Author: Lea Albrecht


tj/rt (Reuters, AP)


Trending Hairstyles

Source : http://www.dw.com/en/curious-baboon-causes-blackout-in-zambian-tourist-town/a-39722908

Curious baboon causes blackout in Zambian tourist town
‘Curious’ baboon knocks out power to Zambian tourist town
'Curious' baboon knocks out power to Zambian tourist town